Stroganoff Italiano

Stroganoff Italiano Beef

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Stroganoff needed a bit of a refresh.

Being flexible in recipes gives birth to creativity. For example, chicken tikka masala was the result of an Indian dish being tweaked to suit a Scottish palate. I took beef stroganoff and added some Italian ingredients without the intention of creating a blog post out of it — it just wasn’t in the cards.

But my result was fantastic.

The spices, vegetables, herbs, and cream all came together to create a lovely dish that got high marks from my dinner guests.

Stroganoff – also known as stroganov -is the result of being named after a 19th century Russian count. And he is an exceptionally worthy namesake for what just so happens to be one of the most popular recipes in the world. The word “stroganoff” is spoken as easily as the meal is eaten. Some say that you shouldn’t fix that which is not broken. But I say that if something can be improved (which anything can, really, if you think hard enough), than why not give it a go? It’s also very important to consider the wonderful aspect of putting your own unique touch on dishes and calling them your own.

I am a strong advocate of creativity and adapting, adopting, and improving, and I know you can be that way!

Do you love cooking? Do you love improving? Then put your own twists on recipes to make them yours.

Anyway, back to stroganoff. This is a recipe that has made its way around the world quite a few times. It first was publicised in a UK cookbook in the first part of the 20th century but became a staple here and in the United States during the decades after World War II. It was also one of the favourite dinners used for dinner parties across this nation and many others. Its prominence unmatched, this wonderful beef dish rightfully earned its place in culinary history.

Although the dish was actually mentioned in print as early as the late 18th century, this is a dish that has been around for ages. It is not exactly a stranger to the culinary scene.

Let’s take a look at the idea of beef that has been sautéed and added to a rich, aromatic, and creamy sauce. How old do you think it is? Go on, have a guess.

I’m just as surprised as you. It is actually hundreds of years old. And dishes like rum baba and kiev chicken, similar in concept, are among its companions. But it declined in popularity, just like kiev and rum baba. It was incredibly unfortunate. However, this dish was not bound for the axe just yet, although it did have a period of disrepute when it was nothing more than an intermittent filling for a jacket potato.

But stroganoff had a resurgence in popularity. People became incredibly attracted to the idea of a very fancy-looking stew. And they wanted to experience it often.

So here it is, the dish of a lifetime. Made and remade over centuries. This is truly a celebratory dish, one to make frequently for dinner parties. You will never receive criticism or a complaint! Not only is it a quick meal to prepare and cook, it is also incredibly flexible. Do what you want to it – play with the recipes to make it meet your specifications.

This is a dish that is unlike its namesake. Russians are stereotypically known as cold and uninviting (don’t worry Russian readers, I love you), but this dish is warm and welcoming.

And it’s always comforting, you can definitely count on that.

Stroganoff Italiano

Ingredients

100g/4oz butter
1 onion, diced
150g/5oz sliced chestnut mushrooms, finely sliced
3 tbsp tomato purée
1 tsp paprika
1 tsp Herbs de Provence
2-3 Roma tomatoes, diced
110ml/4fl oz beef stock
500g/1lb 2oz beef fillet, diced
200ml/7fl oz soured cream
4 tbsp flatleaf parsley

Method

  1. Heat a frying pan until hot, then add half the butter. When foaming, add the onion and fry for 2–3 minutes, or until just softened.

  2. Add the mushrooms and cook 3 minutes.

  3. Add the tomato purée (or paste), and paprika and cook for a further minute.

  4. Add the beef stock and bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 3–4 minutes.

  5. Season the diced beef with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

  6. Heat a separate frying pan and add the remaining butter. When foaming, add the beef and fry for 2–3 minutes on both sides, until browned all over.

  7. Add the soured cream, tomatoes, and herbs de provence to the onion and mushroom and mix.

  8. Add the beef and cook for one minute. Season, to taste, with salt and freshly ground black pepper and add the parsley.

 

Beef Stroganoff Italiano

Ingredients

  • 100g/4oz butter
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 150g/5oz sliced chestnut mushrooms, finely sliced
  • 3 tbsp tomato purée
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp Herbs de Provence
  • 2-3 Roma tomatoes, diced
  • 110ml/4fl oz beef stock
  • 500g/1lb 2oz beef fillet, diced
  • 200ml/7fl oz soured cream
  • 4 tbsp flatleaf parsley

Instructions

  1. Heat a frying pan until hot, then add half the butter. When foaming, add the onion and fry for 2–3 minutes, or until just softened.
  2. Add the mushrooms and cook 3 minutes.
  3. Add the tomato purée (or paste), and paprika and cook for a further minute.
  4. Add the beef stock and bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 3–4 minutes.
  5. Season the diced beef with salt and freshly ground black pepper.
  6. Heat a separate frying pan and add the remaining butter. When foaming, add the beef and fry for 2–3 minutes on both sides, until browned all over.
  7. Add the soured cream, tomatoes, and herbs de provence to the onion and mushroom and mix.
  8. Add the beef and cook for one minute. Season, to taste, with salt and freshly ground black pepper and add the parsley.
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